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T-28 Trojan

Brought to my attention from a T-28 pilot & owner that has the " NAVWEPS T-28 Manual ", which states that a

back type parachute as well as seat type parachute can be used in the T-28 Trojan, thank you David, enjoy your

new Strong Model 303 back chute and your T-28 Trojan.

North American T-28 Trojan
Photo by Max Haynes - MaxAir2Air.com

History: When the United States Air Force set out to replace its aging T-6 Texan trainers, North American was hired to complete the task. What they presented was the Model NA-159 piston-engine trainer; a design that was so successful that it was responsible for gaining a contract for two XT-28 prototypes. After an evaluation of these prototypes and an initial flight on September 26, 1949, the Air Force was so impressed that it ordered production to begin on the newly designated T-28A.

The Trojan, as it became known, had a frameless canopy and a Wright R-1300 engine that, when combined, gave it a top speed that often exceeded 280 mph. First orders of 266 planes in 1950 eventually grew to 1,194. After it became evident that the Air Force had found a very successful design, the United Sates Navy and Marine Corps adopted it as well. Two years later, 489 standardized versions (T-28Bs) were ordered by the Navy, mainly differing from the T-28A in its use of the more-powerful Wright R-1820-86 engine. Following this, 299 T-28Cs were produced, which were fitted with an arrester gear for carrier-deck landing training.

In 1962, North American began supplying T-28Ds for the counter-insurgency role. Six under wing hard-points were added in order for the aircraft to accept a variety of weapons. The T-28 saw action in both Southeast Asia and North Africa. The attack trainer version of the T-28D was called the AT-28D. France's Sud-Aviation converted over 240 T-28Ds into Fennecs and used them as replacements for their Algerian-based T-6s. Fennecs performed admirably in the close-support, reconnaissance and patrol roles.

The T-28's service career, though long, was finally ended by the introduction of the T-34 turboprop trainer, but the T-28 lives on as one of the most popular piston-powered Warbirds in the USA, as well as several other countries.   [History by Kimberly Workman]

Specifications (T-28B):
        Engine: One1,425-hp Wright Cyclone R-1820-86 radial piston engine
        Weight: Empty 6,424 lbs., Max Takeoff 8,500 lbs.
        Wing Span: 40ft. 1in.
        Length: 33ft. 0in.
        Height: 12ft. 8in.
        Performance:
            Maximum Speed: 343 mph
            Ceiling: 35,500 ft.
            Range: 1,060 miles
        Armament: None

 

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